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Handling Weather and Climate Challenges When Placing Concrete

Weather conditions can drastically affect the results of your concrete project. Weather conditions can drastically affect the results of your concrete project. This topic will explore both hot weather and cold weather concrete applications. Hot weather should be taken into consideration when planning concrete projects because of the potential effects on fresh and newly placed concrete. High concrete temperature causes increased water demand, which, in turn, will increase the water-cementitious materials ratio and result in lower strength and reduced durability. Higher temperatures tend to accelerate the rate of slump loss and can cause loss of entrained air and has a major effect on setting time of concrete. At higher temperatures, concrete will set quicker and finishing operations will need to occur at a faster rate. Concrete cured at higher temperatures at an early age will not be as strong as at later ages as the same concrete cured at normal temperatures in the range of 70 degrees F. Successful cold weather concreting requires an understanding of the various factors that affect concrete properties. In its fresh state concrete freezes if its temperature falls below 25 degrees F. The potential strength of frozen concrete can be reduced by more than 50% and it will not be durable. Concrete should be protected from freezing with methods demonstrated in this material. Concrete at a low temperature has a slower setting time and rate of strength gain, factors that should be accounted for when scheduling construction operations and form removal. Concrete exposed to freeze/thaw and water contact must have air-entrainment added.
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Over 32 years and 1.4 million customers worth of experience providing continuing education. Our passion is providing you world-class training to help you succeed in business and as a professional.

Agenda

Hot Weather Concrete
  • Definition
  • Why Is Hot Weather a Problem
  • Ways to Protect Concrete in Hot Weather
  • Mix Design(s)
  • Admixtures
  • Curing
  • Sealing
  • ACI 305 Information
Cold Weather Concrete
  • Definition
  • Why Is Cold Weather a Problem
  • Ways to Protect Concrete in Cold Weather
  • Mix Design(s)
  • Admixtures
  • Curing
  • Sealing
  • ACI 306 Information
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Why Lorman?

Over 32 years and 1.4 million customers worth of experience providing continuing education. Our passion is providing you world-class training to help you succeed in business and as a professional.

Credits

Audio & Reference Manual

This program does NOT qualify, nor meet the National Standard for NASBA accreditation.

MP3 Download

This program does NOT qualify, nor meet the National Standard for NASBA accreditation.

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Why Lorman?

Over 32 years and 1.4 million customers worth of experience providing continuing education. Our passion is providing you world-class training to help you succeed in business and as a professional.

Faculty

Kenneth M. Justice, P.E.

Kenneth M. Justice, P.E.

National Ready Mixed Concrete Association (NRMCA)

  • Senior director of local paving for the NRMCA, promoting the use of ready mixed concrete for parking lots and related flat work
  • Promotes the use of soil cement and full-depth reclamation (FDR) of pavements with cement
  • Works closely with A/E firms, municipal and agency officials, contractors, ready mixed concrete producers and industry personnel
  • Formerly the promotion director for New Jersey and Delaware with the Portland Cement Association Northeast
  • More than 25 years of experience as a civil engineer and engineering project manager, most recently for AECOM, one of the largest consulting engineering firms in the country
  • Specialized in the design and construction administration of runways, taxiways, aircraft parking aprons and vehicular parking lots, as well as other related civil engineering applications such as roads, storm drainage, erosion control planning and environmental planning
  • Registered professional engineer in North Carolina, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania
  • LEED® accredited professional since 2006
  • M.A. degree in civil engineering, North Carolina State University; B.S. degree in civil engineering, Villanova University
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Product ID: 405844
Published 2019
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