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IRS Tax Audits and Collections: IRS Voluntary Disclosure Program 2012 and 2013

 
IRS Tax Audits and Collections: IRS Voluntary Disclosure Program 2012 and 2013

A tax crime is complete on the day the false return was filed.

Between 1945 and 1952, the IRS had a "voluntary disclosure" policy under which a taxpayer who failed to file a return or declare his full income and pay the tax due could escape criminal prosecution through voluntary disclosure of the deficiency, (so long as the voluntary disclosure was made before an investigation was started).

If the IRS determined that a voluntary disclosure had been made, no recommendation for criminal prosecution would be made to the Department of Justice.

Under current IRS practice, the review includes whether there was a true "voluntary disclosure" along with other factors in determining whether or not to recommend prosecution to the Department of Justice. (IRM, Chief Counsel Directive Manual (31) 330 (Dec. 11, 1989) (Voluntary Disclosure).

IRM 9781, Special Agents Handbook 342.14, MT 9781-125 (Apr. 10, 1990) (Voluntary Disclosure). (although prosecution after voluntary disclosure is not precluded, the "IRS will carefully consider and weigh the voluntary disclosure, along with all other facts and circumstances, in deciding whether or not to recommend prosecution").

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Our author, Gary S. Wolfe, has more than 34 years of experience, specializing in IRS Tax Audits and International Tax Planning/Tax Compliance, and International Asset Protection.

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